Health Canada removes sunscreens sold at Gwyneth Paltrow's Goop store

Sunscreens sold by Gwyneth Paltrow‘s lifestyle store, Goop, were removed by Health Canada following a recent inspection.

Health Canada told Global News in an email statement that inspectors visited the store’s pop-up location in Toronto on Friday and found that it was selling sunscreens without a proper licence.

The Beautycounter sunscreen products were removed by the store following a request from the health agency.

READ MORE: Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop pays $145K over ‘unscientific’ claims about vaginal Jade Eggs

All natural health products sold in the country have to be approved by Health Canada before they are put up for sale. A product’s medicinal ingredients, source, dose and potency are among the information assessed.

Sunscreens and other non-prescription drugs or natural health products in Canada also have to meet specific labelling requirements.

The sunscreen’s packaging did not comply with Canadian rules, Goop said in a statement to Global News.

The company added that the mistake was made “inadvertently.”

WATCH: Gwyneth Paltrow’s company Goop is coming to Canada

“We learned that two sunscreens with U.S. packaging from a third party brand were inadvertently sent to Canada. Canadian regulations require different packaging,” the statement read.

“The product itself is compliant with Canadian regulations and is the same formula as sold in the U.S. The packaging issue has been fixed, and we have reached out to Health Canada to ensure our entire assortment exceeds their standards.”

Beautycounter, the company that manufactured the products, noted that it has sold products in Canada since 2016.

“Our products and packaging are consistent with the Canadian regulations. We learned that two of our SPF products with U.S. packaging were inadvertently stocked on the shelves at the Goop pop up shop in Toronto. The issue has been resolved,” a statement provided to Global News read.

READ MORE: Gwyneth Paltrow fires back at claims Goop based on ‘pseudoscience’

Goop, which has a pop-up store in Toronto until late September, has been criticized for endorsing controversial products and beauty practices.

In 2018, Goop agreed to pay US$145,000 in civil penalties to settle allegations that it made unscientific claims about the health benefits of three of its products.

The products included the Jade Egg, a $66 item designed to be inserted into women’s vaginas to supposedly improve their sex lives, the “heart-activating” $55 Rose Quartz Egg and the $22 Inner Judge Flower Essence Blend, a tincture that Goop claimed “assists in the clearing of guilt, shame, self-criticism and blame.”

© 2019 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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